If this stock market turmoil ends up in a liquidity crunch, do you know what the banks will do?
- Original Post from BPWLC BLOG

During the times when there is liquidity crunch, such as now when there is an impending interest rate hike in US or when there is a  stock market rout in the region, what is the most important thing for the banks? Yes, CASH at hand! When there is an extreme liquidity crunch, the banks will tend to play it safe. Whether or not they are going to use it, raising cash is the most important thing to do during such times.
Historically, there were many precedences. During 1998, when there was the Asian Financial Crisis, $DBS(D05) bought POSB. It was the people’s bank with a huge amount of deposits. The main lending activities of POSB at that time was mainly in secured lending such as housing loans and the deposits at that time was huge.
In the recent global financial crisis in 2008, DBS raised S$4.2 billion through rights issue. Seven hundred and sixty (760) million rights were offered at $5.42c, a hefty discount of 45% to the last day trading price of $9.85. Each right was offered at 1:2 basis, meaning 1 right for every 2 shares owned.
In parallel $OCBC Bank(O39)  went into offering prefence shares at $100 per share in August 2008. To sweeten the deal, the dividend rate was offered at an 5.1%, a rate not seen around those years. OCBC raised $1 billion from the exercise. Following that move, $UOB(U11) also followed suit with the same offering but at a slightly lower rate of 5.05%. UOB also raised about $1billion from the exercise.
In such times, when people are fearful and cashing out of the stock market, this appeared to be the best time for the banks to raise cash. After all, with bank interest rate at a low point and with the stock market turmoil, many investors will have to park their encashed money somwehere where there are better returns. With the bank’s brand name and with the sufficiently sweet deal, it is possible for the banks to raise funds with relative ease.
What do the banks do with these money? Well, during market turmoils is one of the best opportnities for the banks. It is a question of survival of the fittest. Many so-called ‘fantastic companies’ will not be trading at historically fire-sale prices unless during these times. Remember that Astra, was one of the crown-jewel of the Indonesia companies before the 1998 Asian Financial Crisis. It was forced to sell its shares to Cycle and Carriage (C&C) before C&C was taken over by the Jardine group. If shares of Astra had not been sold to C&C, Astra would not have been in existence or could have been disintegrated into smaller companies. Who knows Danamon Bank in Indonesia may be up for sale once again with better selling conditions. The last time, when the deal fell through was in 2013, when the Indonesian regulators allowed a maximum cap of 40%. DBS, on the other hand, was looking into acquiring 67.37% (for a price tag of $542.4m) which will ultimately trigger it to make a take-over offer of the bank.
Shareholders, in particular those who hold blue-chips, should maintain your liquidity now. You may be put in a situation to acquire rights or preference shares at a steep discount. Perhaps if you look at it n a long-term basis, it may not a bad deal if you are looking to be rewarded with 500 DBS shares or 1000 OCBC shares as dividend in every dividend distribution exercise.
(Brennen Pak has been a stock investor for more than 26 years. He is the Principal Trainer of BP Wealth Learning Centre LLP. He is the author of the book “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks.”) – The ebook version may be purchased via www.investingnote.com.

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BrennenPak

I just received a message from my broker this morning. The message mentioned that UOB is raising a bond. The following is an abstract.

United Overseas Bank has launched and priced $750 million in non-cumulative, non-convertible perpetual capital securities. They will bear a fixed distribution rate of 4% per annum. The bonds, which will be issued in the denomination of $250,000, are intended to qualify as additional Tier 1 capital under the Basel III framework adopted by the Monetary Authority of Singapore. The bonds may be redeemed at the option of UOB on May 18, 2021, the first call date, and every five years thereafter to a rate equal to the prevailing five-year SGD Swap Offer Rate plus the initial margin of 2.035%. Distributions are payable semi-annually.

bgting

Some recent interesting articles on banks.
Leverage and risk - This one is on the use of derivatives to conceal risks. @bennysam : Maybe this provides a hint on Goldman Sachs. :-)
http://www.moneyandbanking.com/commentary/...

Do Net Interest Margins and Interest Rates Move Together?
https://www.richmondfed.org/publications/r...

Although these articles are on US banks, they do provide some issues to think about.

bennysam

Even Goldman Sachs is raising cash by asking commoners to deposit money with them. This is previously unheard of. I can only guess what their intentions are :-)

BrennenPak

Actually, both OCBC and UOB had raised some notes. in the last 1-2 months.. Of course, they would make it low key because raising debts can affect the share price.


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OCBC is still growing
- Original Post from BPWLC BLOG

Once again, Overseas-Chinese Banking Corporation (OCBC) is dishing out to scrip dividends to existing shareholders. With the discount of 10%, this translates to a mouth-watering conversion rate of $9.57 per share. Given the steep discount, it is likely that many existing shareholders would choose scrip dividends over cash unless the bank share price tanks unexpectedly from now to 18th September. After all, we all learn about power of compounding and it makes sense to continue to invest in this bank whose history existed even before the 2nd world war.


In an effort to keep up with the growing dividends offered by other banks, the declared dividend for the 1st half of 2019 financial year is $0.25 share and is 2 cents higher than that declared for the second half of financial year 2018. Over a period of 10 years, the annualized increment in dividend rate in spite of its increasing share base translates to about 5.8%. With the latest declared dividend of 25 cents per share, it translates to a hefty distribution of more than S$1billion in dividends just for the 1st half of 2019 alone. With the huge dividend payout, and relatively low conversion rate, it is likely to push more shares in the float. It is certainly no child’s play.



But then, why does the bank want to offer scrip dividends to expand its share base? Certainly, it is going to affect the return on equity (ROE) going into the future, unless the bank can better deploy the conserved cash. Without dwelling too much into detailed calculations, the bank appeared to be purchasing its own shares from the market at between mid-$10 and mid-$11 on average, and this scrip dividend distribution at a discount of 10% would have benefited existing shareholders at the bank’s expense. After all, it had already met its CET-1 requirements and there is no necessity for the bank to conserve more cash. So, the only conclusion is expansion plans are on the card, and OCBC beefing its war-chest for such future acquisitions.


A few possibilities are:



  • Buy up the last 13% of Great Eastern shares (GE) and take it private. This is highly unlikely. OCBC had already tried 2 times (maybe more). The last was offered at $16 per share. Unfortunately, the die-hard shareholders held steadfastly to their shares that the take-over bid failed miserably at that time. Now with the share price oscillating between $25 and $30 per share, the possibility to buy up the last few percent is even more remote. It needs a huge premium to dislodge the shares from these shareholders’ hands. Given the expensive exercise, it is very likely that OCBC will leave it status quo and focus on other regional opportunities.

  • Buy up OCBC NISP. Possible, but comparatively unlikely. Again, the last 15% shareholders are likely to hold steadfastly to their shares. Furthermore, there is an authority to deal with, which can come in a surprise. Just a few years ago. DBS’s plan to buy Indonesia’s Danamon Bank (Indonesian’s 6th largest bank) was foiled by the authority placing a 40% limit by foreign institutions. Of course, there is a possibility that OCBC looks to acquire other Indonesian banks, but then it may not serve significant purposes given that it has already had a presence offering banking services there.

  • Increasing its presence in the Greater Bay Area (GBA) in China. This appears to be more likely situation. The CEO has indicated 1-2 year ago that his target is to increase the return from the GBA over the next 5 years. In all likelihood, more resources are likely to go into this region. To date, OCBC has a shareholding of about 12% in the Bank of Ningbo (BON). More recently, it had successfully, acquired Wing Hang Bank in Hong Kong. So, we should expect OCBC to push its growth trajectory for this region.


But then again, to shareholders, growing and acquisitions would mean taking on more risks. If we choose to take the scrip dividend in lieu of cash, we are in a way proportionally taking part in the risk-sharing process made by the bank, for good or for bad. The risk part of the equation, quite often, is conveniently forgotten or, perhaps, obscured by the attractive scrip dividend conversion rate.


Disclaimer – The above points are based on the writer’s
opinion. They do not serve as an advice or recommendation for readers to buy
into or sell out of the mentioned securities. Everyone should do his homework
before he buys or sells any securities. All investments carry risks.


Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 30
years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning
Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value
Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is
also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which
is available in both soft and hardcopy.


I want to have a free
ebook on “Ten golden rules of stock investment” NOW!


More news on
www.bpwlc.com.sg.


The post OCBC is still growing appeared first on BPWLC BLOG.


$OCBC Bank(O39.SI)

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OCBC
- Original Post from BPWLC BLOG

Along with the other banks, OCBC has recently announced the FY 2018 results. The net profit improved 11% from S$4.05b to $4.49b. Apart from its subsidiary, Great Eastern’s disappointing results, I would say that OCBC did well for FY 2018. Along with the reasonably good results, OCBC is offering a dividend of 23 cents per share for H2 FY2018, representing a dividend payout of about 41% for the whole year. This is, however, lower than its peers like DBS and UOB. The dividend payout for DBS and UOB is 56% and 50% respectively. (Click here for the performance numbers.)


Over the years, OCBC appeared to have a greater propensity to pay out scrip dividend compare to the other two banks. This is the 12th time that the bank proposed scrip dividend since the global financial crisis in 2009 . To incentivise the acceptance of scrip dividend, OCBC is offering a 10% discount on the final weighted average price from 3 May to 6 May 2019 (inclusive).


The question to many investors is – what is the purpose of the bank distributing scrip dividend? And is scrip dividend good or bad for shareholders? To me, there is no absolute advantage or disadvantage in having scrip dividends. It depends on what the bank’s objective and what we wanted as a shareholder. The financial advantage of scrip dividend is not exactly apparent. After all, one can create a quasi-scrip dividend exercise by using the cash dividend to buy the bank’s shares in the open market. The brokerage and administrative fees are comparative small in terms of costs as they can be easily offset if we purchase the bank stock at prices lower than the stock’s conversion price. That said, it is still good to discuss about the characteristics of scrip dividend from the bank’s perspective as well as from shareholder’s perspective.


For the bank



  1. Generally, banks (or for that matter any public-listed companies) do not like to have too much volatility in their stock prices. Essentially, they want people with long-term views. By distributing dividends in the form of scrip, it helps, to a certain extent, make shareholders hold onto their stocks longer. For one, by providing scrip dividends that end up in odd-lots in the hands of shareholders. Thus, this makes it more difficult for holders to offload their stocks easily.

  2. By providing a discount to the on-going share price, the bank is, in effect, encouraging shareholders to take the scrip dividend instead of cash. This helps the bank to preserve cash which can be very useful during times of need. Just base on the back-of-envelope calculation, with the dividend of 23 cents per share, it would cost the bank $979.1 million in cash for just this dividend distribution. Even though OCBC is able to meet the current Common Equity Tier 1 (CET-1) requirement, it still went ahead to offer scrip dividends. This may mean that the bank is forecasting uncertain times or it may be preserving a bigger war-chest of cash for some capital investment ahead. While attempting to preserve cash capital, it is, in effect, creating a larger share base. This will have a dilutive effect. It may work against shareholders especially when times turn for the worse. Fortunately, OCBC has been buying up their own shares in the open-market. The bank had been given the mandate in the last shareholders’ annual general meeting to buy up to 212 million (or 5% of the issued shares) in the open market. Certainly, as shareholders, we would be more comfortable with companies that are able to buy back their own shares compare those that are unable to.

  3. While the bank is dabbling in the stock market buying 200,000 shares each time, it is not possible to know whether the bank is gaining or losing out in this whole exercise. After all, their job is not to make a profit by buying shares in the open market. Based on the 5% buy-back mandate from the shareholders, the bank can buy up to 212 million shares. Given that OCBC makes a purchase of 200,000 shares each time, it would take more than 100 trading days to fulfill the whole order, and not including those purchasing shares under the employees’ option scheme. This translates to about 40% of the total number of trading days in a year. In some days, it may buy high and in some days it may buy low. Generally, the stock price during the conversion days tend to be very high as they are very near to the ex-dividend date. So, it means that the conversion stock price tends to be on the high side. So, even if the bank gives a 10% discount over the conversion price, there still may a chance that the bank did not lose out buying from the open market as its average buying price can be much lower than the conversion price. As of today, the conversion price is yet to be determined. It will be the weighted average of the trading share price from 3 May 2019 to 6 May 2019 (Inclusive). Note that a cash dividend is a certainty for the bank. For scrip dividend, this is not certain as to how many shares will be ultimately distributed. With the sweeteners (discounts) for shareholders thrown in, it is yet to be known whether the bank gains or loses out compare to cash dividend. However, one thing if for sure. Less cash will be dispensed, but, at the expense of a larger share base.


Shareholders



  • As shareholders, scrip dividend can be an alternative to cash dividends if the shareholder does not need to the money at that time. The problem of going for scrip dividends it that we end up with odd lots. This can be a bit troublesome if we want to sell them in the future. Although lot size has been reduced from 1000 shares to 100 shares, stockholders are often forced to sell the mother lots in order to amalgamate the sales due to the minimum brokerage charge.

  • As one may point out, there is no need to pay for brokerages and the other administrative fees when we accept scrip dividends in lieu of cash dividends. However, this often not a major issue. As it is, one can create a quasi-scrip dividend by buying the stock from the open market upon the receipt of dividends. The brokerage and all the related fees are relatively small, and can be easily offset if one is able to purchase at a lower trading price than the conversion price calculated by the bank.

  • One point about scrip dividend is that we are able to practice what is known as power of compounding. Say we have 10,000 shares and the dividend rate is $0.23. Assuming a conversion rate of $11.50, we would be entitled 200 shares. The next time when OCBC declares scrip dividends, our share base would be based on 10,200 shares instead of 10,000 shares. As our stock accumulates, we are in effect, practicing the power of compounding. From that point of view, it is true. In essence, I am assuming that the future dividend distribution continues to be the same or higher. In investments, many unexpected things can happen. It is possible that the bank falls onto bad times and have to reduce the dividend rate. A decrease in the dividend rate can have a significant effect on the power of compounding.

  • Certainly, a discount in the conversion price of the scrip dividend is a plus factor to encourage shareholders to take up the scrip dividend. It provides an additional margin of safety. This stands as a cushion in a falling share price situation when the global economy or the business situation for the company turns for the worse. It serves as a good alternative to getting cash dividends.


At the end of the day, there is no absolute advantage or disadvantage to either the bank or to the shareholders. It is more like a question of choice. As mentioned earlier, OCBC has the lowest payout ratio (41% compared to DBS’s 55% and UOB’s 50%.). Perhaps, it has been under pressure to bring up its dividend payout as well. Instead of increasing the dividend rate, it is probably doing so by increasing the share base so that the total payment ratio reaches the mid-40%.


Disclaimer
– The above points are based on the writer’s opinion. They do not serve as an
advice or recommendation for readers to buy into or sell out of the mentioned
securities. Everyone should do his homework before he buys or sells any
securities. All investments carry risks.


Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 30 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.


The post OCBC appeared first on BPWLC BLOG.


$OCBC Bank(O39.SI)

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DBS – shocks and stress in holding stocks
- Original Post from BPWLC BLOG

Today marks the 10th anniversary when Lehman Brothers fell into bankruptcy on 15 September 2008. Despite the on-going tariff war between the US and China, there is a general sea of calmness in the major stock exchanges all over the world. Back then, scene was very different. For several weeks before 15 September and several months after that, the front few pages of our daily newspapers were full of bad news.



Lehman Brother’s downfall also pulled along with it several big banks and financial institutions. AIG, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Fannie Mae & Freddie Mac were all at risks, and were awaiting government bailout. With the crisis hitting the big financial institutions in the world’s largest economy at that time, it is almost certain that small and open economies, like Singapore, was going to feel the onslaught as well. The STI fell from the high at close of 3,875.77 made on 11 October 2007 to 2,486.55 on 15 September 2008, retreating 35.8%. It did not stop there. As bad news, continued to flush all over the news media, the STI fell further. DBS, a good proxy of the Singapore economy, and a heavy weight on the STI certainly cannot escape from this avalanche. Its share price fell from more than $20 to less than $10 by the end December 2008, retreating more than 50%. Everywhere is fear, and we did not know which blue-chip stock, in particular which financial stock, was going to go under. Fund managers were all selling as redemptions picked up speed.


Perhaps, the stubborn side of me helped. I decided to swim against this tide, buy a few shares, close my eyes, close my ears, go for a long haul, do not sell irrespective of whatever happened, and see how it would turn out after 10 years. In the worst-case situation, I would lose some savings. If I have been wanting to own DBS, this would have been a good opportunity. In a financial crisis of such a scale, huge wealth is transferred one person’s pocket to another’s pocket. Debtors will be punished, creditors will be rewarded. Spenders will become poor, and savers will feel rich. Cash is king. However, cash is still only cash if it remains in the bank. So, this should be the time to put our cash into good use. Splurge and buy up assets that had never been put on such discounts, was the key.


A few weeks after purchasing the stock, came the next bombshell. DBS decided to raise rights, 1 for 2 shares, with a whopping 45% discount at $5.42 based on the last day trading price at $9.85. It literally forced existing shareholders to take up the rights. So, no choice, I dipped further into my pocket to pick up the rights. (I remember, I tried to buy extra rights, but I believe I only managed to get a few shares to round off the lots due to over subscription of the rights.)


In the midst of such a crisis and with a much bigger market float after the rights issue, the share price continued to fall. In fact, the share price went even below $7. It certainly, took some grits and guts to continue to hold the shares. Even at $7, it was still a long way to fall if it was really going to be very bad. My intuition impressed upon me that if DBS were to fail at that time, we would all be in real serious trouble. Our property price would plunge, our car value would be decimated and our Singapore dollars would be very unstable in the forex market. So, whether we are on shares, on property or on cash, it was not going to matter. And, with the US dollars also plunging at that time, the only shelter is probably gold. After all, it was only 10 years ago then that DBS gobbled up POSB. In the minds of those people on the street, POSB was still the people’s bank. It is unlikely that it would be allowed to fail. The epicenter of this financial crisis was in the US. We are only feeling the effects of this financial tsunami. The question was how low could DBS touch, and not whether it would fail. It turned up well, and the fear was quite short-lived. The stock came up back again after March 2009, when STI temporarily went below 1,500.


Was it plain sailing after that? Not quite. I should ask, were there anything along the way to de-rail holding the stock? Certainly yes. When I purchased the stocks, my objective was to go long, and very long and to disregard the share price. So, the only ‘physical benefit’ was the dividend from the stock. At that time, this ‘giam-siap’ (stingy) bank, gave only $0.60 per share as dividend. When a reliable source, told me that the bond coupon rate of Swiber was at 7%, I felt stupid again. If we invested in the bond at the cost of $250k, the yearly coupon would have been $17,500. A back-of-envelope calculations of the equivalent amount, would have been about 15,000 DBS shares at the prevailing price of between $16.50 and $17.00. For 15,000 DBS shares, the dividend would only be $9,000. And this stark difference would carry on yearly, for probably 4-5 years, until the bond matured. If one were to chase for the last dollar, it would make sense to sell DBS shares and buy Swiber. So, would it make sense to sell off the shares and buy bond instead? Nobody knows what was going to happen. But, I do believe when the bond yields were high at that time, many people actually switched out of equities and buy bonds as well as other high yield instruments. It was lucky. I chose to remain in equities. The reason was that there was literally no secondary market. If we really wanted to sell, nobody was going to buy from our hands, unless we depress our price significantly. Precisely, at that time, due to liquidity, the corporate bond of Genting was trading at a discount, while the perpetual bonds were trading at a premium. So, if we want to get into it, the only choice was to hold corporate bonds to maturity. It turned out that the decision was right. Swiber defaulted and remain suspended today. And, DBS was no longer a ‘giap-siap’ bank as it used to be. It doubled its dividend. And, right now the yield based on the average purchased price would have enjoyed an even higher yield compared to Swiber or the any REITs. In fact, this stock would have become an equity-bond situation mentioned in the book “Warren Buffet and the Interpretation of Financial Statements”, by Mary Buffet and David Clark, 2008. It left me scratching my head what was the term ‘equity-bond’ really mean at that time when I was reading that book. Now, I understand. In a few words, it means to buy an equity, let the share price move up to its intrinsic value. As the dividend starts to move up back-on-the-heels of the equity price, we would have, in effect, enjoyed the yields of bonds.


Then again, were there any more scares along the way? Certainly yes. When China suddenly devalued the RMB in 2016, it was envisaged that China was not doing well on the economic front. That again pushed down the STI. In particular, the bank stocks were hit. All the three banks stocks were trading about 10% below book value. DBS, once again, fell below $14 for the first time in the few years. It had been languishing around $16-$17 per share almost throughout the year 2016. Only in 2017 did DBS share price climb up slowly and steadily, following of several quarters of good financial results. With the announcement of its new dividend benchmark, it had arbitrarily created a floor for the share price. If the bank continues maintain its dividend payout of $1.20 per share, it should help maintain the share price north of $24 per share, giving a yield of about close to 5% per share.


It has come a long way, and will there be more volatility going forward. Certainly yes, the tariff issues between the US and China is still yet to be resolved. Also, for so many years, the interest rates all over the world have been held extremely low. Debts were now at their historical highs once again. If FED were to increase interest rates aggressively, I would not be surprise that another crisis could erupt, maybe, this time, the epicenter is nearer to us. Then again, DBS share price can get hit again.


Disclaimer – The above arguments are the personal opinions of the writer. They do not serve as recommendations to buy or sell the mentioned securities or the indices or ETFs or unit trusts related to it.


Join us in the facebook – BP Wealth Learning Centre LLP.


Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 28 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.


$DBS(D05.SI)

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DBS – shocks and stress in holding stocks
- Original Post from BPWLC BLOG

Today marks the 10th anniversary when Lehman Brothers fell into bankruptcy on 15 September 2008. Despite the on-going tariff war between the US and China, there is a general sea of calmness in the major stock exchanges all over the world. Back then, scene was very different. For several weeks before 15 September and several months after that, the front few pages of our daily newspapers were full of bad news.



Lehman Brother’s downfall also pulled along with it several big banks and financial institutions. AIG, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Fannie Mae & Freddie Mac were all at risks, and were awaiting government bailout. With the crisis hitting the big financial institutions in the world’s largest economy at that time, it is almost certain that small and open economies, like Singapore, was going to feel the onslaught as well. The STI fell from the high at close of 3,875.77 made on 11 October 2007 to 2,486.55 on 15 September 2008, retreating 35.8%. It did not stop there. As bad news, continued to flush all over the news media, the STI fell further. DBS, a good proxy of the Singapore economy, and a heavy weight on the STI certainly cannot escape from this avalanche. Its share price fell from more than $20 to less than $10 by the end December 2008, retreating more than 50%. Everywhere is fear, and we did not know which blue-chip stock, in particular which financial stock, was going to go under. Fund managers were all selling as redemptions picked up speed.


Perhaps, the stubborn side of me helped. I decided to swim against this tide, buy a few shares, close my eyes, close my ears, go for a long haul, do not sell irrespective of whatever happened, and see how it would turn out after 10 years. In the worst-case situation, I would lose some savings. If I have been wanting to own DBS, this would have been a good opportunity. In a financial crisis of such a scale, huge wealth is transferred one person’s pocket to another’s pocket. Debtors will be punished, creditors will be rewarded. Spenders will become poor, and savers will feel rich. Cash is king. However, cash is still only cash if it remains in the bank. So, this should be the time to put our cash into good use. Splurge and buy up assets that had never been put on such discounts, was the key.


A few weeks after purchasing the stock, came the next bombshell. DBS decided to raise rights, 1 for 2 shares, with a whopping 45% discount at $5.42 based on the last day trading price at $9.85. It literally forced existing shareholders to take up the rights. So, no choice, I dipped further into my pocket to pick up the rights. (I remember, I tried to buy extra rights, but I believe I only managed to get a few shares to round off the lots due to over subscription of the rights.)


In the midst of such a crisis and with a much bigger market float after the rights issue, the share price continued to fall. In fact, the share price went even below $7. It certainly, took some grits and guts to continue to hold the shares. Even at $7, it was still a long way to fall if it was really going to be very bad. My intuition impressed upon me that if DBS were to fail at that time, we would all be in real serious trouble. Our property price would plunge, our car value would be decimated and our Singapore dollars would be very unstable in the forex market. So, whether we are on shares, on property or on cash, it was not going to matter. And, with the US dollars also plunging at that time, the only shelter is probably gold. After all, it was only 10 years ago then that DBS gobbled up POSB. In the minds of those people on the street, POSB was still the people’s bank. It is unlikely that it would be allowed to fail. The epicenter of this financial crisis was in the US. We are only feeling the effects of this financial tsunami. The question was how low could DBS touch, and not whether it would fail. It turned up well, and the fear was quite short-lived. The stock came up back again after March 2009, when STI temporarily went below 1,500.


Was it plain sailing after that? Not quite. I should ask, were there anything along the way to de-rail holding the stock? Certainly yes. When I purchased the stocks, my objective was to go long, and very long and to disregard the share price. So, the only ‘financial benefit’ was the dividend from the stock. At that time, this ‘giam-siap’ (stingy) bank, gave only $0.60 per share as dividend. When a reliable source, told me that the bond coupon rate of Swiber was at 7%, I felt stupid again. If we invest in the bond at the cost of $250k, the yearly coupon would have been $17,500. A back-of-envelope calculations of the equivalent amount, would have been about 15,000 DBS shares at the prevailing price of between $16.50 and $17.00. For 15,000 DBS shares, the dividend would only be $9,000. And this stark difference would carry on yearly, for probably 4-5 years, until the bond matured. If one were to chase for the last dollar, it would make sense to sell DBS shares and buy Swiber. So, would it make sense to sell off the shares and buy bond instead? Nobody knows what was going to happen. But, I do believe when the bond yields were high at that time, many people actually switched out of equities and buy bonds as well as other high yield instruments. It was lucky. I chose to remain in equities. The reason was that there was literally no secondary market. If we really wanted to sell, nobody was going to buy from our hands, unless we depress our price significantly. Precisely, at that time, due to liquidity, the corporate bond of Genting was trading at a discount, while the perpetual bonds were trading at a premium. So, if we want to get into it, the only choice was to hold corporate bonds to maturity. It turned out that the decision was right. Swiber defaulted and remain suspended today. And, DBS was no longer a ‘giap-siap’ bank as it used to be. It doubled its dividend. And, right now the yield based on the average purchased price would have enjoyed an even higher yield compared to Swiber or the any REITs. In fact, this stock would have become an equity-bond situation mentioned in the book “Warren Buffet and the Interpretation of Financial Statements”, by Mary Buffet and David Clark, 2008. It left me scratching my head what was the term ‘equity-bond’ really mean at that time when I was reading that book. Now, I understand. In a few words, it means to buy an equity, let the share price move up to its intrinsic value. As the dividend starts to move up back-on-the-heels of the equity price, we would have, in effect, enjoyed the yields of bonds.


Then again, were there any more scares along the way? Certainly yes. When China suddenly devalued the RMB in 2016, it was envisaged that China was not doing well on the economic front. That again pushed down the STI. In particular, the bank stocks were hit. All the three banks stocks were trading about 10% below book value. DBS, once again, fell below $14 for the first time in the few years. It had been languishing around $16-$17 per share almost throughout the year 2016. Only in 2017 did DBS share price climb up slowly and steadily, following of several quarters of good financial results. With the announcement of its new dividend benchmark, it has arbitrarily created a floor for the share price. If the bank continues maintain its dividend payout of $1.20 per share, it should help maintain the share price north of $24 per share, giving a yield of about close to 5% per share.


It has come a long way, and will there be more volatility going forward. Certainly yes, the tariff issues between the US and China is still yet to be resolved. Also, for so many years, the interest rates all over the world have been held extremely low. Debts were now at their historical highs once again. If FED were to increase interest rates aggressively, I would not be surprise that another crisis could erupt, maybe, this time, the epicenter is nearer to us. Then again, DBS share price can get hit again.


Disclaimer – The above arguments are the personal opinions of the writer. They do not serve as recommendations to buy or sell the mentioned securities or the indices or ETFs or unit trusts related to it.


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Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 28 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.


$DBS(D05.SI)

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DBS – The pleasant surprise
- Original Post from BPWLC BLOG

Abstract – Two years ago, the sudden devaluation of the Chinese yuan RMB caused DBS share price to fall below its book value. Since then, DBS Holdings share price has been on the rise. In a similar fashion, the share price of OCBC and UOB also fell to below their respective book value. For the past two years, the share prices of all the three banks were rising at unprecedented pace. As of 23 Feb 2018, the share prices of DBS, OCBC and UOB were respectively at $29.59, $13.37 and $28.05 respectively.


It came as a big surprise to many that DBS announced a very generous dividend distribution policy following their internal assessment that they have been more than fulfilled the Basel reform requirements. Historically DBS has never been this generous and their dividend distribution to share price ratio has almost always been lagging behind OCBC. Even during times when they offer scrip dividends, their discount has always been lower than that of OCBC. As their share price advanced, the number of scrip dividends that can be converted from the dividends gets smaller, and it became extremely daunting for people who has been targeting to get, for instance, 500 shares for every year of dividend declared. In simple arithmetic, by the time the share price hit about $20, we need to have at least 15,152 DBS shares before one can get 500 shares of scrip dividends assuming that no discount was given for taking scrip dividends. As the share price goes upwards, it is almost an impossible task as the horses are running well ahead of the chariot.



But that all changed overnight as DBS suddenly moved up the dividend generously from the expected final dividend of 33 cents for FY 2017 dividend to 60 cents and topped it up with a special dividend of 50 cents. In addition, it further announced that the dividend going forward to be marked up to $1.20. This means that we should generally expect the dividend pay out to be $1.20 per share for 2018 and, perhaps, even for the next few years. The whole dividend equation changed overnight. What that has been a more and more distant dream of getting 500 shares for each yearly dividend distribution became an instant possibility overnight. For example, in the above case, we do not need 15152 shares for have 500 shares of declared dividend. Instead, we need to have only 8333 DBS shares to get an equivalent of 500 DBS shares in declared dividend. Fortunately, or perhaps unfortunately, depending on whether one owns the shares or still wanting to buy the shares, the share price never look back. It has been gradually rising two weeks ago from $25.36 on 7 February, the closing price on the day before the results announcement, to $29.59 as of yesterday. This represents a rise of more than $4 or about 16.7% rise within a matter of two weeks, literally unperturbed by the Chinese new year holidays in between. With the newly declared dividend for at least in the near future, it actually helps provide a ‘floor’ share price for the stock. (For those who wish to have a better idea of the valuation may wish to refer to my on-line course on the investingnote.com platform – Value Investing – The Essential Guide) For example, the share price of $24 would now have been considered a steal when it was said to be ‘extremely expensive’ even at $20/- just twelve months ago.


Apart from the positive effect on its share price, the newly declared dividend distribution by DBS has other pulling effects too. It turned on the pressure for the other two banks to up their dividends going forward as well. In fact, in the latest results announcement for FY2017, both OCBC and UOB have already declared a higher dividend whether in the form of the final or special dividends. As we all know, bank performances tend to move in tandem with each other. So, with the more generous declaration for DBS, it is also likely that the heat for OCBC and UOB be turned on to bring up their dividends as well. Even if that do not happen in the near future, the current perception of a higher dividend declaration would help push up their share prices. Adding to this tail-wind is the expectation of higher net interest margin in the coming months. That means the shareholders of the all the banks would ‘huat’ (prosperous) in the light of this pleasant announcement.


Disclaimer – The above arguments are the personal opinion of the writer. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell the mentioned securities.


Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 28 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.


$DBS(D05.SI)

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